Wisdom Has No Name:

A Mythopoetic Healing Story

“I begin to lose my grip. An orange and purple ball of light hangs loosely from the left side of my neck. My neck is tilted to the side trying to hold on. It’s scary. Then the ball moves to the right side of my head behind my right eye- up and around inside my head, down my neck, settling into a pool in my chest- bridging my womb, heart and head where there is now a free channel of communication. My neck feels tingly and open. There is a purple pyramid in my forehead. It is peaceful. A large yellow ball of light in my solar plexus moves up through my neck. The pyramid in my forehead turns into a six pointed star- it is three dimensional and transparent- I am inside of it feeling aligned, open, and peaceful.”

These words come from a healing session (used with permission) of someone who had been experiencing chronic neck pain that had not resolved through various forms of Western medicine and complementary medicine. This experience came about through craniosacral therapy and acupressure with the intention of listening to what the chronic neck pain had to share about what is needed for healing.

Instead of trying to cure the neck pain from the outside in, the inner world was engaged with a spirit of openness and curiosity toward the pain. Wu wei is a term used in Taoism, which roughly translates as doing without doing, or effortless effort. It comes from a stillness and silence deep within one’s own being, and through surrender- the spirit with which one follows the natural unfolding of the Tao without forcing or holding back. Artists, healers and musicians throughout all of time embody the secret of surrender- wu wei- deep listening- spontaneity- of being the hollow reed or hollow bone through which the Tao- the mystery can unfold as a living expression.

In the spirit of wu wei, a whole journey was able to unfold. After this session there was a marked reduction in the neck pain, and an on-going dialogue between the the inner and outer world had begun.

This experience opened up new questions along with new possibilities emerging from the wisdom of the body itself. Listening and following the wisdom of the body is vital and necessary to bringing forth healing and change in a grounded, lasting way.

Instead of taking the metaphors that show up as being literal, concrete and fixed this type of healing asks us to engage in a creative, dynamic, fluid exploration of the unknown and unknowable- unfolding at its own pace, in its own time, in its own way. In this way, we are able to live our way into what is trying to emerge.

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Circumambulating Through the Mists of Indifference:

Seeing With New Eyes

“We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started

And know the place for the first time.” 1

 

Indifference is like a slowly forming fog that goes unnoticed until, heavy and enshrouded, the thick embankment of its pervasive presence is obscuring our vision and dulling our perceptions.

Miriam Webster defines indifference several ways: “marked by a lack of interest, enthusiasm, or concern for something : APATHETIC :marked by impartiality : UNBIASED :characterized by lack of active quality : NEUTRAL and not differentiated, capable of development in more than one direction”.

If this experience has to do with a ‘lack of active quality’ and is related to undifferentiated potential, I wonder what is possible by entering into rather than resisting this all-encompassing dullness. I take my inquiry to the forest to walk the labyrinth.

As I cross the parking lot to the path that leads to the labyrinth, a palpable shift is felt in my body. Here in the forest I am at once grounded and expanded. Some invisible, tightly woven membrane begins to soften. There is a sense of relief trickling through my being like life giving waters beginning to seep through the crevices of dry earth.

 

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Video by David Hall

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Medicine of the Yellow Woman Go-Between 1

 

“At the still point of the turning world. Neither flesh nor fleshless;
Neither from nor towards; at the still point, there the dance is,
But neither arrest nor movement. And do not call it fixity,
Where past and future are gathered. Neither movement from nor towards,
Neither ascent nor decline. Except for the point, the still point,
There would be no dance, and there is only the dance.
I can only say, there we have been: but I cannot say where.
And I cannot say, how long, for that is to place it in time.
The inner freedom from the practical desire,
The release from action and suffering, release from the inner
And the outer compulsion, yet surrounded
By a grace of sense, a white light still and moving…”2

There is a natural and necessary space which allows for continuity of movement and change, like the space between one gear and another or like the space between atoms, stars, and planets. Without the gap/space, fluidity of movement is limited or stopped and possibilities diminished. Perhaps for a moment, or for a very long while.

When experiencing the territory of gaps in life it can be uncomfortable, disorienting, terrifying, and exciting. A known way of life no longer exists, and what is next is not yet clear. Chaos, confusion, and all manner of shadow material can obscure clarity. Yet this space of ‘in-between’ is infinitely powerful and necessary to creating new life.

There is a time for action- for doing- and when all that can be done has been done, one must wait, stay alert, and be present until the spark of what is next emerges to show the way. In order to ‘center’ the chaos of change, it is necessary to tend this delicate place with patience, compassion, and fierce commitment to ourselves- to truth- to mystery- to life itself. This sacred container is where a new center of gravity- a new possibility- around which one’s being or life is able to orient, crystalize, and emerge.

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